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Supermarkets

Aldi reclaims title of ‘nation’s favourite supermarket’ in satisfaction survey

Aldi has been rated the nation’s favourite in-store supermarket in Which?’s annual best and worst supermarket satisfaction survey.

Customers were impressed with Aldi’s special offers, as well as the quality of its fresh and own-label products and the ease of finding items on its shelves, Which? said.

It is the second time Aldi has come top in Which?’s annual survey, previously taking the top spot in 2014. The budget supermarket retailer has replaced Waitrose at the top, a position it held for three years.

Waitrose dropped down to fourth as its customers gave it a two-star rating for its value for money, in contrast to Aldi’s five.  

Marks & Spencer came in at second place with five-star ratings across store appearance, quality of own-label products and the quality of fresh products.

Lidl ranks in third position with five stars for its value for money, but did not do so well with customers when it came to queuing time, staff availability and range of products.

The big four supermarkets – Tesco, Asda, Morrisons and Sainsbury’s – languish at the bottom of the in-store survey. Customers at Sainsbury’s were least impressed with its special offers and value for money, bringing it in last out of nine supermarkets.

Among online supermarkets, Iceland has claimed the top spot for the third year running, which it shares with Ocado for the first time.

Asda was left at the bottom of the online supermarkets table, where it has been for more than a decade.

Alex Neill, managing director of Which?, said: “With food costs rising it seems as though shoppers have felt the pinch and are voting with their feet and wallets. Aldi and Lidl have won over their customers with value for money, knocking Waitrose off the top spot.

“The big four supermarkets need to up their game or risk losing their customers to other supermarkets who are doing a better job of giving people what they want.”

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