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Why are brick-and-mortar stores still important for retail

Many people believe that using e-commerce websites is the key to having a future in retail. Without having to leave one’s home, many consumers have taken a liking towards using online-based retailers to purchase a wide variety of products through the internet. Even so, the presence of e-commerce platforms doesn’t necessarily mean that retail stores have become an outdated form of conducting business in the modern age.

Checking for product quality and performance

Not all products can translate well into a customer’s shopping experience when browsed and purchased online. The clothing industry, for instance, has varying sizes and fits, depending on the type and brand of clothing that’s being sold. A purely online store cannot replicate the experience of trying in person the different sizes of the same model or comparing its fit with other brands.

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An in-store experience provides a unique and irreplaceable component of shopping for specific products while receiving aid from customer care assistants. Over 35% of consumers who shop for computer equipment and electronics prefer to have an in-store exchange for testing out items before their purchase. With the danger of purchasing and having to return a defunct product, the same can be said for various products in the tech industry, including gaming consoles and household appliances.

Showcasing an in-store experience

Stores need to be weighed not just on the sales that they contribute but also for the credibility that they give to a brand. That is why establishments, such as bookstores and tech retail stores, express a specific lifestyle through their store’s visual interior. Brick-and-mortar stores don’t just function as an avenue to sell products. They also capture the sensory experience delivered by the company.

Emotion plays a significant role in a person’s shopping behaviour. What shoppers do in entering a local store isn’t just for purchasing essential products but also in engaging in a sensory experience. 

Digital marketing agency, Marketingsignals.com surveyed 1,056 UK adults shoppers to ask what medium they prepared to shop and browse for products. An astounding 85% majority reveals that they’re in favour of visiting brick-and-mortar stores over online platforms.

Diversifying selling platforms

Although the public perception of online-based retailers has been overwhelmingly positive, the numbers don’t reflect this opinion. In 2017, of the £366 billion gained in sales through ONS figures of retail sales, a staggering 85% of the purchases happened in stores instead of online. 

In response to this trend, online-based businesses are slowly building towards the traditional needs of leasing local brick and mortar stores while longstanding enterprises are expanding their shopping options to include online formats.

Digital marketing strategies are utilised not just to sell products online but also to increase foot traffic towards brick-and-mortar stores. The development of both traditional and modern forms of retail has made people realise the importance of developing different ways to operate their businesses.

Online-based businesses are slowly building towards the traditional needs of leasing local brick and mortar stores while longstanding enterprises are expanding their shopping options to include online formats. The development of both traditional and modern forms of retail has made people realise the importance of developing different ways to operate their businesses.

Conclusion

The growing popularity of the e-commerce trend has made both online and brick-and-mortar stores embrace each other’s uniqueness in providing service to a diverse group of consumers. Instead of focusing on one channel for selling options, enterprises need to diversify their selling mediums moving forward.

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