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Asda pledges to be a net zero carbon business by 2040

The company, which is headed by Roger Burnley, also promised to remove three billion pieces of plastic from products by 2025

Asda has pledged to become a net zero carbon business by 2040, as the company publishes its first Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) report. 

According to the grocer, the push to become a net zero carbon business will see the group reduce its GreenHouse Gas emissions by 50% by 2025. 

Asda said that the report was produced following “extensive research” with more than 3,000 customers to understand which ESG-related issues mattered most to them. 

It was discovered that affordable greener choices, reducing single-use plastic and cutting food waste were the top three priorities for shoppers.

To meet customer demands, Asda has also pledged to make it affordable for customers to shop sustainably through the ‘Greener at Asda Price’ promise and cut food waste by 20% by 2025 as part of the Courtauld commitment –  a voluntary agreement between grocery industry players that aims to reduce food packaging waste and household food waste.

The company, which is headed by Roger Burnley, also promised to remove three billion pieces of plastic from products by 2025. 

Burnely said: “Asda has always been a retailer that sits at the heart of the communities it serves and the events of the last 12 months have highlighted the important role we play in helping to tackle societal challenges.

“Despite the challenges of the pandemic, we have not lost sight of our wider ESG responsibilities and this report provides an update of where Asda is now on the issues that matter most to our colleagues, customers and communities and importantly where we want to be in the future.”

He added: “It builds upon our existing create change for better commitments and the resilience we have shown during the last 12 months means we are well positioned to help customers make greener, healthier and responsible choices when they shop with us.”

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