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ASOS teams up with High Commission in Mauritius for modern slavery event

Online fashion retailer ASOS is hosting an event with the British High Commission in Mauritius today (22 February).

The event will bring together local and international stakeholders to discuss the challenges in managing labour migration and agree a common framework for improving worker protection in Mauritius and beyond.

Organised as part of ASOS’ modern slavery commitments and coinciding with discussions between the Mauritian and Bangladeshi governments on labour migration and workers’ rights, the event will take place in Port Louis, Mauritius.

There will be presentations and talks from the Mauritian and Bangladeshi governments, the International Labour Organisation, the IndustriALL Union, the Ethical Trading Initiative and Anti-Slavery International.

Also attending the event will be executives from fashion brands manufacturing on the island including, Adidas, zLabels, Puma, Woolworths and Whistles, among others.

Last year ASOS released its first ‘Modern Slavery Statement’ in line with UK legislation, in which it expressed its commitment to eradicating modern slavery from its supply chain. Following reviews of all 11 factories in ASOS’ Mauritian supply chain, the island was highlighted in the statement as an area of risk.

Simon Platts, sourcing director, ASOS, said: “We’re grateful for the support of the British High Commission, the Mauritian and Bangladeshi governments and the many other speakers and guests attending today’s event.

“The hope is that by sharing experience and expertise, we can encourage efforts to prevent exploitation during recruitment, and engage governments to effectively enforce legislation to protect migrant workers.

“Ultimately we believe this collective approach will help to protect the rights of workers in Mauritius, particularly those who are most vulnerable.”

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