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Luxury Goods

Kering publishes new standards for animal welfare

Luxury fashion giant Kering has published its new animal welfare standards in order to “ensure and verify” the humane treatment of animals across the group’s supply chains.

The first phase of the standards, which launched on 13 May, also include detailed requirements for the treatment of cattle, calves, sheep and goats throughout their entire lives, as well as guidelines for abattoirs.

Developed over three years with input from animal welfare experts, farmers and herders, scientists and NGOs, the standards are based on the latest scientific research as well as legislation, comparative standards, best management practices and guidelines from different sectors.

According to the group, the ‘Kering Animal Welfare Standards’ are the first-ever set of full standards covering animal welfare for luxury and fashion, and aim to drive “positive change” in industry practices, and beyond.

Marie-Claire Daveu, chief sustainability officer and head of international institutional affairs, said: “Improving the welfare of animals must be an imperative for our industry and Kering wants to amplify the focus of attention from a few species to all of the animals, including livestock, within fashion’s global supply chains.

“Reflecting François-Henri Pinault’s vision, our standards are aligned with our commitment to a holistic approach to sustainability, which means having best practices that encompass animals in our supply chains, wildlife around them and biodiversity conservation more broadly.

She added: “We hope for widespread adoption of the standards through collaborating with our suppliers, our peers in luxury, the fashion industry at large, and with the food sector, in these shared supply chains to ultimately shift how we, as a society, treat animals and nature.”

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